The Liverpool Muslim Institute – Where Islam was Born in Britian

The Liverpool Muslim Institute was founded by one of the first Native British Muslims, Abdullah Quilliam, in 1887. Its historical significance to the development of British Muslim Society is unquestionable.

Numbers 8, 9 and 10 Brougham Terrace, Liverpool are buildings of historical significance. Built in 1830, they are part of the original building made up of 12 terraces and named after the then Lord Chancellor Henry Peter, the first Baron Brougham and Vaux.

Numbers 8, 9, and 10 subsequently took on a very interesting history, which is important to modern Liverpool, Britain and Muslims around the world. These properties became the first site of Islamic worship and Mosque in the UK. It was, and is, the first and only mosque built by a native Englishman. The buildings are also important because they were the Office of the first Sheikh of Islam of the British Isles. Islamic rites such as deaths, marriages, Friday and Eid prayers were performed at the centre, and Fatwas were delivered by Abdullah Quilliam for Muslims on important issues.

It was from the top balcony at the front of this Georgian terrace that Abdullah Quilliam and the Muslims would stand and call the Azaan. This call to prayer would echo into the heart of 19th century Liverpool.

The Institute went through a long period of dormancy which resulted in its very gradual dilapidation. Being a place of British Muslim Heritage, its restoration project was undertaken by the Abdullah Quilliam Society that saw the need and importance of retaining the Mosque to its former glory.

The Society has been instrumental in rejuvenating both the exterior and interior of the mosque to the point where it is now able to hold regular prayers once again. It is very important for British Muslims all over the country to be aware of this heritage and to be active in preserving its existence.

 

 

 

 

(We would like to stress that Imams Online is not affiliated with The Quilliam Foundation Think Tank – We only aim to showcase British Muslim Heriatage)

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